Arachnophobes look away now! Horrifying moment dozens of huntsman eggs hatch in Aussie’s bedroom will give you spider nightmares
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This is the horrifying moment dozens of huntsman eggs hatch in an Aussie’s bedroom.

Kristy Griffin, 28, from Greendale, New South Wales, said huntsman spiders had always given her the creeps, so she was terrified to spot one lurking outside her bedroom window.

But it wouldn’t be long before the heavily-pregnant arachnid made its way inside, bringing with it a gigantic batch of offspring, just days from hatching.

The spiders can be seen emerging from a gooey egg sac on the inside of the window like something straight out of a horror movie, with the enormous huntsman standing guard, before it later appears to devour a section of the egg sac.

The huntsman – one of the largest spider species in the world – had found its way between the inner and outer layers of Kristy’s sliding windows. 

The huntsman spider standing guard behind its offspring beside the gooey egg sac in Austalia

A view of the eggs beside the huntsman spider

The huntsman spider standing guard behind its offspring beside the gooey egg sac in Austalia

Kristy Griffin, 28, from Greendale, New South Wales, said huntsman spiders had always given her the creeps, so she was terrified to spot one lurking outside her bedroom window

Kristy Griffin, 28, from Greendale, New South Wales, said huntsman spiders had always given her the creeps, so she was terrified to spot one lurking outside her bedroom window

The spiders can be seen hatching from the gooey egg sac like something straight out of a horror movie, with the enormous huntsman standing guard, before it later appears to devour a section of the egg sac

The spiders can be seen hatching from the gooey egg sac like something straight out of a horror movie, with the enormous huntsman standing guard, before it later appears to devour a section of the egg sac

Kristy said: ‘I was sh****** myself! Huntsman have always made me nervous because of how quickly they move – they give me the heebie jeebies. 

‘I first noticed the spider while she was still outside, just in the top corner of my bedroom window.

‘I actually thought it was a microbat at first because she was very pregnant, she was huge!

‘Jokingly I said to my mum ‘I hope she doesn’t go in my room overnight.

‘Well the next morning I opened my curtain and there she was.’

But Kristy, a free-range chicken farmer, didn’t have the heart to turf her out.

She said: ‘I was originally going to relocate her, but then I felt bad because she’d probably get eaten by a bird outside.

‘So she made her egg sac and I started to educate myself on huntsman spiders so I could look after my new roommate and not be as scared.

‘I misted the window near her daily, making sure not to wet her eggs, so she could have a drink if she needed it.

‘Other than that I just let her be, I didn’t want to stress her out.’

Kristy continued: ‘I was nervous and still am a little bit – I keep picturing my room overrun by galloping giants, or waking up in the morning with one on my face or something.

The egg sac can be seen on the inside of Kristy's window bubbling as the spiders start to hatch

Dozens of them then emerge in scenes that are likely to bring about nightmares for arachnophobes

The egg sac can be seen on the inside of Kristy’s window bubbling as the spiders start to hatch. Dozens of them then emerge in scenes that are likely to bring about nightmares for arachnophobes

‘But I’ve managed to overcome my fear through educating myself, and I’ve learnt just how fascinating they really are.

‘I still get nervous when they move quickly though.’

Needless to say, Kristy’s decision caused some controversy at home.

She said: ‘My parents live with me and my dad wasn’t too happy.

‘My mum was a little bit more understanding because neither of us like killing things. I have a soft spot for all the critters deemed unlovable.’

Kristy has been told that the spiders are social huntsmans.

The social huntsman, or Delena cancerides, is part of the Sparassidae family, which includes the world’s largest spider by leg span at up to 12 inches – the giant huntsman.

Social huntsman are huge too – capable of reaching a leg span of nearly eight inches – and they can lay some 200 eggs in their egg sacs.

Kristy said: ‘They can stay with their babies for six months after they hatch.

‘So I get to see them grow up, and they can catch flies and mosquitoes for me in the meantime, unless they decide to move on.’

The huntsman had found its way between the inner and outer layers of Kristy’s sliding windows

The spider on the wall of Kristy's home in Greendale, New South Wales

The spider on the wall of Kristy’s home in Greendale, New South Wales

Now Kristy is encouraging others not to fear the giant spiders – even if they’ve got scores of babies in tow.

She said: ‘If you don’t want it there, just relocate it, otherwise let it do its thing.

‘They’re fantastic bug catchers and usually stay out of your way. Plus they’re fascinating to watch when they catch something.’

She continued: ‘The key to getting over a fear is education I’ve found. You usually fear the unknown.

‘All critters are just trying to survive, and go about their day and have just as much right as us to be here.’



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