Millennial parents claim boomer generation has ABANDONED them over childcare and are ‘too busy traveling’ to help out – as grandparents hit back and say ‘we didn’t have a damn nanny’
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Boomers are spending far more money on travelling than their parents did – leaving their own millennial kids without childcare as they jet off on vacations.

Psychologist and millennial mother Leslie Dobson, 40, said she wishes her dad Ted Dobson, 71, was around to spend more time with her sisters and his grandchildren.

But Dobson’s dad is busy enjoying retirement on his boat in Mexico, he said ‘I haven’t spent a nickel less on my kids. I just spent some on me.’

The Los Angeles psychologist said that she wasn’t alone in feeling disappointed by her father – and that many of her millennial clients are facing the same feelings of abandonment and resentment towards their parents.

Millennials are having children later in life – and many modern households include two working parents. 

Boomers are leaving their millennial children to handle the childcare of their grandchildren while they jet off on vacations - like Ted Dobson, 71, in this picture who moved to Mexico after retiring and bought a boat

Boomers are leaving their millennial children to handle the childcare of their grandchildren while they jet off on vacations – like Ted Dobson, 71, in this picture who moved to Mexico after retiring and bought a boat 

Psychologist and millennial mother Leslie Dobson, 40, said that she wishes her dad Ted was around to spend more time with her sisters and his grandchildren

Psychologist and millennial mother Leslie Dobson, 40, said that she wishes her dad Ted was around to spend more time with her sisters and his grandchildren

Even though the boomer parents – born between 1946 and 1964 – are mostly retired by the time they need them to step in for childcare, members of the older generation are jetting off on vacations instead instead of lending a helping hand. 

Bank of America analyzed consumer-spending habits and found that, not only are boomers outspending other generation on travel and dining out – they are also spending far more on their travels than their own parents in the silent generation.

Dobson told Business Insider: ‘It is a really common struggle. You have children, and it feels even more like an abandonment that they’ve chosen their life over meeting their grandchildren and building these relationships.’

She described the phase as a three-fourth life crisis in which boomers realize that their life is almost over and frantically want to make the most of it.

Ted Dobson’s three-fourth life crisis involved uprooting his life in California after working there as a businessman and fleeing to Mexico – where he bought a boat and lives in a luxury community. 

The younger Dobson said her father ‘feels like this is the right choice’ – but admitted the decision has upset her and her sisters, who are now raising their own children and envisioned having a grandfather around to dote on their kids.

But the retired businessman insists that even though he’s now enjoying his dream lifestyle of boating and pickleball – he still did plenty to help kids kids out with financial support.

‘They’ve all got nannies,’ he said. ‘We didn’t have a damn nanny. They drive expensive SUVs. I drove a fricking minivan.’ 

The 71-year-old said the last time he went to visit his kids in the U.S. they couldn’t squeeze him into their busy schedule.

‘Life revolves around the children, and you’re either on board or you’re not,’ he said. 

Another millennial facing similar rejection from her mother is Kristjana Hillberg – who grew up always having her grandmother around for childcare whenever her parents took a trip or needed help.

Hillberg, 33, told Business Insider: ‘If Mom and Dad ran out of town, we were at Grandma’s. Grandma wasn’t going anywhere, and we always knew that.’

The mom-of-three doesn’t receive the same help from her parents – especially at short notice and only on their terms.

‘We have to make sure that we are asking months in advance,’ she said – adding that her parents ‘own travel plans’ also needed to be accounted for in childcare arrangements.

Another millennial facing similar rejection from her mother is Kristjana Hillberg - who grew up always having her grandmother around for childcare whenever her parents took a trip or needed help

Another millennial facing similar rejection from her mother is Kristjana Hillberg – who grew up always having her grandmother around for childcare whenever her parents took a trip or needed help

Hillberg said it’s especially hard to recruit her 61-year-old mother Nella Hanson for babysitting duty after she remarried in February.

Hanson was ‘a saint’ before her recent wedding, according to Hillberg – who said her mother was always on hand to watch her daughter.

The newlywed turned down Hillberg’s recent request to watch her three young children while she went on a girls vacation to Costa Rice with her friends. 

‘I thought it would be a shoo-in and she would automatically come and watch the kids,’ she said. ‘But she said, ‘I recently married, and I don’t want to leave for seven days.”

‘Watching your mom find love at 60 is overwhelming… in a good way.’ Hillburg said. ‘She took us everywhere alone when we were kids. My dad was always working. All of my memories are of her.’

Hanson said she understood that her daughter was put out by her lack of availability – and said she adores her grandchildren – but it was the “right time” to put herself and her new husband first.

While boomers – who own more than $78 trillion in assets – have been living life to the fullest in their later years, childcare has been steadily and steeply inclining. 

Recent data shows that the average family was spending $700 a month on daycare – which is 32 percent more than what was being spent in 2019. The cost of childcare has tripled since 1991.



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