Tommy Robinson is arrested and escorted by more than a dozen police from Campaign Against Antisemitism march after he was told to stay away by organisers – as thousands gather in central London waving Israeli flags and holding ‘Hamas made me Jewish’
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Tommy Robinson has been arrested today as he joined thousands of protesters who gathered in London during an anti-Semitism march despite being told by organisers to stay away. 

The English Defence League founder was seen being escorted away from the march by police after arguing with officers for around 10 minutes outside Soho coffee shop opposite the Royal Courts of Justice. 

The Met Police has been in frequent contact this week with the march’s organisers who had raised concerns that Mr Robinson attending would ’cause fear for other participants’.

Scotland Yard arrested Mr Robinson after he refused to leave the area when asked to by police officers. He claimed to be there ‘as a journalist’ but his arrest was not due to this, the Met Police said. 

A large group gathered outside the Royal Courts of Justice for the rally organised by  the volunteer-led charity Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The organisers have said it is the largest demonstration against anti-Semitism since 1936, with 104,000 estimated to be here.

Tommy Robinson was seen being escorted away from the march by police after arguing with officers for around 10 minutes outside Soho coffee shop

Tommy Robinson was seen being escorted away from the march by police after arguing with officers for around 10 minutes outside Soho coffee shop

Mr Robinson claimed to be there 'as a journalist' and alleged police were trying to stop him 'from reporting'. The Met Police said this did not play a factor

Mr Robinson claimed to be there ‘as a journalist’ and alleged police were trying to stop him ‘from reporting’. The Met Police said this did not play a factor

The English Defence League founder is led away by police officers as people take part in a march against antisemitism

The English Defence League founder is led away by police officers as people take part in a march against antisemitism

He was seen arguing with officers for around 10 minutes outside Soho coffee shop opposite the Royal Courts of Justice and was then taken away from the scene

The Met Police has been in frequent contact this week with the march's organisers who had raised concerns that Mr Robinson attending would 'cause fear for other participants'

The Met Police has been in frequent contact this week with the march’s organisers who had raised concerns that Mr Robinson attending would ’cause fear for other participants’

Scotland Yard arrested Mr Robinson after he refused to leave the area when asked to by police officers

Scotland Yard arrested Mr Robinson after he refused to leave the area when asked to by police officers

English Defence League founder Tommy Robinson pictured today in a cafe before his arrest

English Defence League founder Tommy Robinson pictured today in a cafe before his arrest

‘The same view has been voiced by others,’ the Met Police wrote on X. 

‘As a result, he was spoken to and warned on more than one occasion that his continued presence in the area was likely to cause harassment, alarm and distress to others.

‘He was directed to leave the area but refused to do so. We’er aware that the man had suggested he was in the area as a journalist. This was not a relevant factor in his arrest.’ 

Prior to his arrest, the Mr Robinson said: ‘Met Police attempting to intimidate me and stop me from reporting on the antisemitism march happening today in London. Absolute disgrace @metpoliceuk.’

BBC journalists defied bosses to attend the march with ‘a large proportion of Jewish staff’ said to have been in attendance.

Earlier this week senior managers at the broadcaster caused fury when they allegedly banned staff who work in news, current affairs or factual journalism or are senior leaders from attending the march.

A BBC insider told MailOnline ‘every Jewish member of staff I know thinks it’s a deplorable decision’.  

One member of staff, who felt nervous about going, told MailOnline: ‘If I don’t go I’m letting my family and friends down. And for what? To uphold guidelines that have left Jewish colleagues feeling insecure.’

One BBC employee, who did not want to give his name, said: ‘I’m here as a proud Jew but scared of living in Britain right now.

Demonstrators march against antisemitism, after an increase in the UK, during a temporary truce between the Palestinian Islamist group Hamas and Israel, in London

Demonstrators march against antisemitism, after an increase in the UK, during a temporary truce between the Palestinian Islamist group Hamas and Israel, in London

The group of a few thousand have been seen waving Israeli and Union flags and holding placards

The group of a few thousand have been seen waving Israeli and Union flags and holding placards

A large group has gathered outside the Royal Courts of Justice for the rally organised by charity Campaign Against Antisemitism

A large group has gathered outside the Royal Courts of Justice for the rally organised by charity Campaign Against Antisemitism

‘I’ve seen nothing in writing but the general feeling is BBC staff are banned from attending this today. Which is shocking.

‘I’m worried I’d get sacked if I gave my name.

‘I’m worried about living in Britain right now. But I’m here to defy that and show my support. We are scared. We are worried.’

The man in his 40s, who lives in north London, added: ‘It’s pretty surreal the numbers here. It’s also pretty surreal that in Britain we need a demonstration against anti-Semitism.

‘That’s sad in itself but also a sign of where we are.’

The group of a few thousand has been seen waving Israeli and Union flags and holding placards reading ‘Never Again Is Now’ and ‘Zero Tolerance for Antisemites’, while other posters read ‘Rape is not resistance’ and ‘Hamas made me Jewish’.

Today’s march comes after 18 demonstrators were arrested in the capital yesterday during a rally calling for a permanent ceasefire in Gaza – with anti-Semitic banners and placards on display throughout the march. 

Today’s event, organised by the charity Campaign Against Antisemitism, will see protesters carry out a 90-minute march starting at the Royal Courts of Justice. 

Boris Johnson, Rachel Riley, Vanessa Feltz, and Coronation Street star Maureen Lipman are also in attendance at the march. 

Mr Johnson visited Israel earlier this month alongside Australia’s former prime minister Scott Morrison.

The former prime minister told GB News: ‘Whatever the rights and wrongs of what Israel has done, or is doing, I think that the anti-Semitism we have seen in some of the marches around Europe has really confirmed for me the absolutely human necessity for Israel to exist.’ 

Ms Lipman thought the turnout was ‘amazing’ and said it was ‘great to come and show support’.

She told MailOnline: ‘We dont want to be here for why we are here, but we have to be here.

‘As the Jewish community, we’re in shock. There has been a terrible reckoning. It has frightened all of us.

‘We’re in total shock still. David Baddiel is right, Jews don’t count. That’s why we have to march.’

(Pictured left to right) Tracey-Ann Oberman, Eddie Marsan, Rachel Riley and Maureen Lipman take part in the march against antisemitism

(Pictured left to right) Tracey-Ann Oberman, Eddie Marsan, Rachel Riley and Maureen Lipman take part in the march against antisemitism

Boris Johnson, his wife Carrie and baby Frank joined the thousands of demonstrators gathered in central London today to rally against anti-semitism

Boris Johnson, his wife Carrie and baby Frank joined the thousands of demonstrators gathered in central London today to rally against anti-semitism

Mr Johnson, 59, appeared bundled up against the biting temperatures in a woolly hat, while 35-year-old Carrie held their child together in a baby carrier

Mr Johnson, 59, appeared bundled up against the biting temperatures in a woolly hat, while 35-year-old Carrie held their child together in a baby carrier

The former Prime Minister was also joined by his sister Rachel in the march organised by the Campaign Against Antisemitism, which began by the Royal Courts of Justice

The former Prime Minister was also joined by his sister Rachel in the march organised by the Campaign Against Antisemitism, which began by the Royal Courts of Justice

Women hold images of hostages held in Gaza, during a march against antisemitism

Women hold images of hostages held in Gaza, during a march against antisemitism

A man, wearing a kippah, holds the British flag at a march against antisemitism

A man, wearing a kippah, holds the British flag at a march against antisemitism

People hold Israeli and British flags during a march against antisemitism in London today

People hold Israeli and British flags during a march against antisemitism in London today

Poeple can be seen holding placards reading 'Never Again Is Now' and 'For Israel Against Antisemitism'

Poeple can be seen holding placards reading ‘Never Again Is Now’ and ‘For Israel Against Antisemitism’

Vanessa Feltz interviewing a person taking part in a march against antisemitism organised by the volunteer-led charity Campaign Against Antisemitism at the Royal Courts of Justice

Vanessa Feltz interviewing a person taking part in a march against antisemitism organised by the volunteer-led charity Campaign Against Antisemitism at the Royal Courts of Justice

Police officers in attendance as people take part in a march against antisemitism in London

Police officers in attendance as people take part in a march against antisemitism in London 

Posting ahead of the event Jewish office manager Ryan Coleman, 55, has attended to support Israel.

He said: ‘The right against anti-semitism is real. I have friends who have been abused in the street purely for being Jewish.

‘This is against hate. This is about being part of society in a peaceful way. I think it’s going to send out a very strong message. 

‘Tommy Robinson is not welcome here. He is a disgrace.’

Paul Redman, 32, has travelled from his home in Wembley. The builder said: ‘The support will be amazing. We are fearful as Jewish people in this country and that’s horrific. It’s scary right now.’

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: ‘Week after week, central London has become a no-go zone for Jews. 

‘We have witnessed mass criminality, including glorification of terrorism, support for banned terrorist organisations such as Hamas, and incitement to racial or religious hatred against Jews.’ 

They added: ‘The sad truth is that Jews do not feel safe in our capital city.

‘Britain is known for its tolerance and decency, and we know that the people of this country stand with the Jewish community in this difficult time.’ 

Yesterday thousands of pro-Palestine protesters flooded the streets of Central London shouting a ‘from the river to the sea’ chant – with children as young as five joining in.

Yesterday thousands of pro-Palestine protesters flooded the streets of Central London shouting a 'from the river to the sea' chant, with some holding anti-Semitic banners

Yesterday thousands of pro-Palestine protesters flooded the streets of Central London shouting a ‘from the river to the sea’ chant, with some holding anti-Semitic banners

Protesters held placards and Palestinian flags while taking part in a 'National March For Palestine' in central London yesterday

Protesters held placards and Palestinian flags while taking part in a ‘National March For Palestine’ in central London yesterday 

Pro-Palestine demonstrators unfurled a giant Palestinian flag as they passed The Cenotaph decorated with poppies, in Whitehall yesterday

Pro-Palestine demonstrators unfurled a giant Palestinian flag as they passed The Cenotaph decorated with poppies, in Whitehall yesterday 

Eighteen demonstrators were arrested in the capital yesterday during the rally calling for a permanent ceasefire in Gaza

Eighteen demonstrators were arrested in the capital yesterday during the rally calling for a permanent ceasefire in Gaza

Police closed off Whitehall near Trafalgar Square as Pro-Palestine protesters gathered after an earlier march ended

Police closed off Whitehall near Trafalgar Square as Pro-Palestine protesters gathered after an earlier march ended

Anti-Semitic banners and placards were on display as Met Police officers made arrests – after issuing a hate speech warning which saw Arabic-speaking officers deployed to watch for offensive chants and images in the crowd.

‘From the river to the sea’ is considered to be highly inflammatory and some claim it’s a call for Israel to not exist with signs at the protest displaying the same phrase.

Police distributed leaflets at the protest to warn attendees about what language and behaviour will not be tolerated – but one protester said ‘the leaflet from the police is a waste of time. 

‘I don’t know anybody who has read it or took the slightest bit of notice’. 

A young woman was reportedly holding a hand-drawn placard which read ‘stop doing what Hitler did to you’ – making a comparison between Israel’s strikes on Gaza and the Holocaust perpetuated by the Nazis.

The police also arrested a man on suspicion of inciting racial hatred by carrying a placard with Nazi symbols on it.

Another man was arrested on suspicion of supporting a proscribed organisation after he was filmed wearing a green headband with Arabic writing, imitating the ones that Hamas wear.

Police posted on X, formerely known as Twitter, to say that when he was stopped by officers, ‘multiple headbands’ were found on him and he was arrested.

Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote on X yesterday: ‘Today, London once again saw scenes of racism against Jews and calls for intifada on our streets. 

‘Tomorrow, London will be a different city. One of tolerance and decency.’ 





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