Even more bad news for Biden: Trump now leads Dem. president in FIVE of six key swing states, and is snapping at his heels in hold-out Wisconsin, new NY Times poll shows
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Donald Trump is now leading polls in five of the six key swing states – as well as beating Joe Biden on key issues like the economy, immigration, and national security, a new NYTimes poll shows. 

Former President Trump is ahead with voters in Nevada, Georgia, Arizona, Michigan, and Pennsylvania by margins of at least three to 10 percentage points. 

Wisconsin is currently the only swing state where Biden had a two point lead, according to the new poll by the New York Times and Siena College.  

Arizona, Georgia, Nevada, Pennsylvania were four of the states the Democrat beat the Republican in during their 2020 White House face-off.

The poll revealed that two-thirds of the electorate sees the country moving in the wrong direction under Biden, and that the multiracial and multigenerational coalition with Kamala Harris is not having the same positive effect that it did in 2020. 

Just 37 percent of people say they trusted Biden with the economy, compared to 59 percent with Trump – which is one of the largest issue gaps, the polling suggested. 

Biden’s bragging rights on ‘Bidenomics’ has fallen short too – with a measly two percent saying the economy was ‘excellent’ during his tenure.  

According to the statistics, young voters under the age of 30 are only favoring  Biden by a single percentage point – and men are preferring Trump by double the margin that women are choosing Biden.

Meanwhile, Biden’s pull with Hispanic voters is down to single digits – and traditionally Democratic black voters are now registering 22 percent support for Trump.

The NYTimes described the flip as ‘a level unseen in presidential politics for a Republican in modern times’ and described the poll as showing a ‘gradual racial realignment’ between the two parties. 

The movement away from Biden shows that despite Trump’s sensational indictment on criminal charges four times he would win more than 300 Electoral College votes this time next year. 

According to the survey, voters across all income levels felt that policies under Biden had hurt them personally (18 points disadvantage) whereas Trump’s policies had helped them (17 point advantage.)

Biden’s senile age of 80 also played a massive factor, according to the data. 71 percent of the pollsters – from every demographic – said he was ‘too old.’

Comparatively, just 39 percent saw Trump, 77, as too old. 

Voters also preferred Trump over Biden on immigration, national security, and on the current Israel Palestine by 12, 12, and 11 points respectively. 

The new data is similar, but shows some key differences, compared to the New Morning Consult/Bloomberg survey released last week.

In that polling, Trump is ahead of Biden among registered voters in Arizona, Georgia, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. 

Trump was also down as leading Biden in North Carolina, a state that went for Trump in 2016 and 2020.

New Morning Consult/Bloomberg statistics saw Biden leading in Nevada – whereas the NYT/Siena data shows Trump as the forerunner in that state. 

Despite the differences, two surveys suggest that the presidential race is set to be tight in the contested political battlegrounds.   

Voters preferred Trump over Biden on immigration, national security, and on the current Israel Palestine by 12, 12, and 11 points respectively

Voters preferred Trump over Biden on immigration, national security, and on the current Israel Palestine by 12, 12, and 11 points respectively

While Biden has been touting the magic of ‘Bidenomics,’ 51 percent of swing-state voters said they felt the national economy was better off during the Trump years, according to the New Morning Consult/Bloomberg survey.

Going forward, 49 percent said they would trust Trump with the economy, while 35 percent said the same thing of Biden.

Only 26 percent of voters said Bidenomics has been good for the economy, while 49 percent said Biden’s policies have been bad.

Among swing-state voters who registered the economy as their No. 1 issue, just 14 percent said Bidenomics is working, while 65 percent say it’s not.

Trump is the most dominant on the issue of immigration, followed by the economy, and then crime, U.S.-China relations, guns, the Russia-Ukraine war, the regulation of tech companies and even has a four-point edge on infrastucture, despite Biden’s bipartisan infrastructure bill being one of his signature legislative achievements.

Biden often mocks Trump for being involved in a scandal every time the Republican president tried to hold a White House infrastructure week.

Biden’s most dominant issue is the curtailing of climate change, followed by abortion, healthcare, democracy, Social Security and Medicare and he holds a slight edge over Trump on education and schools – despite Republicans finding some political success when bringing up issues like Critical Race Theory and parents having more control over K-12 curriculum.

But swing state voters rated the economy as their top issue, with roughly three in four saying it was headed in the wrong direction.

A ‘red wave’ had been predicted last year, but Democrats ended up maintaining control of the Senate and Republicans only flipped the House by a few seats.

Additionally, former President Barack Obama faced similar doom-and-gloom polls a year out from his 2012 election win against Republican Mitt Romney.

‘Coming off those historic midterms, President Biden’s campaign is hard at work reaching and mobilizing our winning coalition of voters more than one year out on a winning, popular agenda,’ Biden campaign spokesperson Kevin Munoz said.

‘We’ll win in 2024 by putting our heads down and doing the work, not by fretting about a poll,’ he added.

Last week, Trump predicted that he will win Iowa‘s Republican presidential caucuses in January over DeSantis – tossing aside what he called advisers’ caution not to overstate expectations.

The former president’s confidence came despite the fact he greeted his Iowa audience in Sioux City by the wrong name. He called the location ‘Sioux Falls,’ which is actually a city in South Dakota.

‘I go around saying of course we’re going to win Iowa. My people said you cannot assume that,’ Trump told his audience in the ornate Orpheum Theater in Sioux City, Iowa.

According to the statistics, young voters under the age of 30 are only favoring Biden by a single percentage point - and men are preferring Trump by double the margin that women are choosing Biden

According to the statistics, young voters under the age of 30 are only favoring Biden by a single percentage point – and men are preferring Trump by double the margin that women are choosing Biden

‘There’s no way Iowa is voting against Trump ,’ he said, noting the economic benefits to farm states from the tariffs his administration imposed on China.

And yet, when Trump took the stage he gave a hearty hello to a city more than 80 miles north, and over the South Dakota state line. He said: ‘Hello to a place where we’ve done very well, Sioux Falls. Thank you very much.’

Several minutes later, he realized the gaffe and corrected himself.

It was Trump’s eighth campaign event in Iowa in a little more than a month, part of the former president’s accelerated fall schedule leading up to the first-in-the-nation caucuses in January.

Trump’s speech in Sioux City, the heart of GOP-heavy western Iowa, followed events over the past month in eastern and central Iowa, where he has drawn thousands of people as his team has attempted to run a more organized campaign than in 2016.



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